All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Moldova & Transnistria
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: 29 Oct 2009 17:31 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 19 Sep 2018 15:39
Posts: 3616
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Moldova

..............Image


Many people in the world have never heard about Moldova. They even wonder that such country exists. Then follow timid wild guesses of its location: Africa! Asia! No? Where it may be? However that happens through no fault of those people. There’s very little information about Moldova on the Internet. So, the time has come to tell the world about Moldova!

Moldova is a small country which is situated in the Eastern Europe. Its territory is just 33,700 sq km and the country is squeezed between Ukraine and Romania. Its major part lies between Prut and Dniester rivers. Moldova is situated very close to Black Sea however it’s landlocked country. Thanks to close location to the sea the climate in Moldova is temperate continental. Summers are warm and winters are mild.

In antiquity, the territory of the present day country was part of Dacia, then fell under the influence of the Roman Empire. In the Middle Ages, most of the present territory of Moldova was part of the Principality of Moldavia. In 1812, the eastern part of this principality was annexed by the Russian Empire and became known as Bessarabia. Between 1856 and 1878, two southern counties were returned to Moldavia, which in 1859 united with Wallachia to form modern Romania.

Upon the dissolution of the Russian Empire in 1917, an autonomous, then independent Moldavian Democratic Republic was formed, which joined Greater Romania in 1918. In 1940, Bessarabia was occupied by the Soviet Union, and was split between the Ukrainian SSR and the newly created Moldavian SSR. After changing hands in 1941 and 1944 during World War II, the territory of the modern country was subsumed by the Soviet Union until its independence on August 27, 1991. Moldova was admitted to the United Nations in March 1992.

In September 1990, a breakaway government was formed in Transnistria, the strip of Moldova on the east bank of the river Dniester. After a brief war in 1992, it became de facto independent, although no UN member has recognized its independence.



Center of Chisinau city, the Capital of Moldova



Parliament



Night Chisinau










_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Moldova & Transnistria
Post Number:#2  PostPosted: 29 Oct 2009 20:16 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 19 Sep 2018 15:39
Posts: 3616
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Transnistria

Image.....................


Transnistria, also known as Trans-Dniester or Transdniestria (see section "Names" for more) is a disputed region in Eastern Europe, located mostly in a strip between the Dniester River and Ukraine. Since its declaration of independence in 1990, and especially after the War of Transnistria in 1992, it is governed by the unrecognized Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR), which claims the left bank of the river Dniester and the city of Bender within the former Moldavian SSR. The modern Republic of Moldova does not recognize the secession and considers territories controlled by the PMR to be a part of Moldova's sovereign territory.

The industrialised territory to the east of the Dniester, generally known as Trans-Dniester or the Dniester region, was formally an autonomous area within Ukraine before 1940 when the Soviet Union combined it with Bessarabia to form the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic.

This area is mainly inhabited by Russian and Ukrainian speakers. As people there became increasingly alarmed at the prospect of closer ties with Romania in the tumultuous twilight years of the Soviet Union, Trans-Dniester unilaterally declared independence from Moldova in 1990.

There was fierce fighting there as it tried to assert this independence following the collapse of the USSR and the declaration of Moldovan sovereignty. Hundreds died. The violence ended with the introduction of Russian peacekeepers. Trans-Dniester's independence has never been recognised and the region has existed in a state of lawless and corrupt limbo ever since.

The region reasserted its demand for independence and also expressed support for a plan ultimately to join Russia in a September 2006 referendum which was unrecognised by Chisinau and the international community.

It still houses a stockpile of old Soviet military equipment and a contingent of troops of the Russian 14th army. Withdrawal began under international agreements in 2001 but was halted when the Trans-Dniester authorities blocked the dispatch of weapons. Subsequent agreements to resume did not reach fruition as relations between Moscow and Chisinau cooled.

After the dissolution of the USSR, tensions between the Moldovan government and the breakaway PMR escalated into a military conflict that started in March 1992 and was concluded by a ceasefire in July 1992. As part of that agreement, a three-party (Russia, Moldova, Transnistria) Joint Control Commission supervises the security arrangements in the demilitarized zone, comprising 20 localities on both sides of the river. Although the ceasefire has held, the territory's political status remains unresolved: De jure part of Moldova, Transnistria is a de facto independent state. It is organised as a presidential republic, with its own government, parliament, military, police, postal system, and currency. Its authorities have adopted a constitution, flag, national anthem, and a coat of arms.

Transnistria is sometimes compared with other post-Soviet frozen conflict zones such as Nagorno-Karabakh, Abkhazia, and South Ossetia. The latter two have recognised Transnistria as an independent state and plan to establish "diplomatic relations" in return for Transnistria's recognition of them (see Community for Democracy and Human Rights). No UN member recognizes Transnistria.



City of Rybnitsa, northern Transnistria

.......

....................................

......

.......

.......

The Other Moldova

[video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_KKtD4nmFac&feature=fvw[/video]

_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Moldova & Transnistria
Post Number:#  PostPosted: 02 Feb 2010 02:19 
Offline
Been there - Done That & Got the T-shirt
User avatar

Joined: 02 Jan 2010
Last Visit: 26 Feb 2017 05:25
Posts: 145
Thanks for the information Wiz. Very interesting information on the poorest country in Europe.


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Moldova & Transnistria
Post Number:#4  PostPosted: 02 Feb 2010 07:51 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 19 Sep 2018 15:39
Posts: 3616
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Brian

One of our members LesH has a G/F from there and of course I try my best to keep adding information for many places and cities, which new members who have not visited or with little experience of the FSU will find it useful and interesting.

My view is that we can add as many places as we can so one day our galleries will offer a good selection and information about the towns and cities of the FSU countries.

I hope also our members who visit these places can add many photos too! [happy.gif]

_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB